Tami Tyson | Migraines
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Migraines

More than 300 million people worldwide- about 6 to 7 percent of men and 15 to 18 percent of women — suffer from migraine headaches, which can last anywhere from a few hours to three days. An estimated 20 million migraine attacks occur every single day.

Are Your Migraines Due to a Vitamin Deficiency?

In this latest study, vitamin B6, B12, and folic acid supplements were found to produce a two-fold reduction in migraines over a six-month period. Previous studies, such as a 2004 study  the European Journal of Neurology, have also reported that high doses of B2 (riboflavin) can help prevent migraine attacks.

Certain gene mutations and dysfunctions can lead to higher levels of homocysteine production, which can make you more susceptible to migraine attacks. Here they found that vitamins B6 and B12 work by reducing your homocysteine levels. They also discovered that depending on your genotype, you may need a higher or lower dose in order for it to work. Said Professor Lyn Griffiths:

If all patients received the same vitamin dosage for the same period of time it would be expected that those with TT genotypes, having a reduced enzymatic rate, would metabolise less homocysteine over the treatment period compared to C allele carriers, thus resulting in a smaller reduction in homocysteine and consequent migraine symptoms.

 

In order to get absorb the proper amount of Vitamins and nutrients we need to have a healthy gut. 80% of disease starts in the GUT!

What causes Head aches?

 

  • Many people experience migraines when they eat certain foods, especially wheat, dairy (especially pasteurized), sugar, artificial preservatives or chemical additives. Cured or processed meats, alcohol, aspartame, caffeine, and MSG are common culprits.
  • Allergies: Including food allergies and food sensitivities, and chemical sensitivities.
  • Dehydration and/or Hunger
  • Changes in sleeping cycle: Both missing sleep and oversleeping can trigger a migraine.
  • Stress: Any kind of emotional trauma can trigger a migraine, even after the stress has passed.
  • Physical exertion: Extremely intense exercise or even sex has been known to bring on migraines.
  • Hormones: Some women experience migraines before, or during their periods, during pregnancy, or during menopause. Others may get migraines from hormonal medications like birth control pills, or hormone replacement therapy.
  • External stimuli: Bright lights, loud noises and strong smells (even pleasant ones) can trigger a migraine.
  • Weather changes, seasonal changes, and changes in altitude

 

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